Revenge porn to be criminalised in Western Australia domestic violence law

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Revenge porn to be criminalised in Western Australia domestic violence law

State proposes a two-year jail term for cyber-stalking or posting explicit images of a partner or former partner and introduces new retraining order

The Western Australian government aims to criminalise cyber-stalking and revenge porn with new family violence legislation.

Under the proposed laws, anyone who cyber-stalks or posts revenge porn online to blackmail or humiliate their current or former partner could face a two-year jail term.

The restraining orders and related legislation amendment (family violence) bill 2016 will be introduced into WA parliament this week.

The WA attorney general, Michael Mischin, said the bill would better protect victims of family violence and hold perpetrators accountable for their actions.

“On its own, the justice system cannot eliminate family violence,” he said. “However, we can encourage and support victims of violence in the home while seeking to deter, and punish, those in the community who choose to offend, and that is what this law does.”

The legislation introduces family violence restraining orders, which allow the court to order an offender to attend a behaviour change or intervention program, and to restrain them from distributing or publishing intimate images of a person as well as cyber-stalking.

Breaching the conditions of a family violence restraining order will be punishable by two years in jail.

Mischin said the bill strengthened WA criminal laws in relation to unlawful acts which caused harm to a woman’s unborn child or the loss of her pregnancy.

“If a person intentionally causes grievous bodily harm to a pregnant woman which results in the loss of her pregnancy, that person will face up to 20 years’ imprisonment,” he said.

“A person who causes grievous bodily harm to a woman’s unborn child in other circumstances could be jailed for up to 14 years.”

 

Article Source: The Guardian

2016-12-12T01:28:20+00:00